Phrasal verb catch on

3 forms of the verb catch on The English verb 'catch on' is pronounced as [kæʧ ɒn].
Related to: irregular verbs, phrasal verb.
3 forms of verb catch on: Infinitive (catch on), Past Simple - (caught on), Past Participle - (caught on).

Here are the past tense forms of the verb catch on

👉 Forms of verb catch on in future and past simple and past participle.
❓ What is the past tense of catch on.

Catch on: Past, Present, and Participle Forms

Base Form Past Simple Past Participle
catch on [kæʧ ɒn]

caught on [kɔːt ɒn]

caught on [kɔːt ɒn]

What are the 2nd and 3rd forms of the verb catch on?

🎓 What are the past simple, future simple, present perfect, past perfect, and future perfect forms of the base form (infinitive) 'catch on'?

Learn the three forms of the English verb 'catch on'

  • the first form (V1) is 'catch on' used in present simple and future simple tenses.
  • the second form (V2) is 'caught on' used in past simple tense.
  • the third form (V3) is 'caught on' used in present perfect and past perfect tenses.

What are the past tense and past participle of catch on?

The past tense and past participle of catch on are: catch on in past simple is caught on, and past participle is caught on.

What is the past tense of catch on?

The past tense of the verb "catch on" is "caught on", and the past participle is "caught on".

Verb Tenses

Past simple — catch on in past simple caught on (V2).
Future simple — catch on in future simple is catch on (will + V1).
Present Perfect — catch on in present perfect tense is caught on (have/has + V3).
Past Perfect — catch on in past perfect tense is caught on (had + V3).

catch on regular or irregular verb?

👉 Is 'catch on' a regular or irregular verb? The verb 'catch on' is irregular verb.

Examples of Verb catch on in Sentences

  •   I believe this strange new fashion will catch on (Present Simple)
  •   I didn't catch on to what was happening here (Past Simple)
  •   I'm trying to catch on to a job in industry (Present Simple)
  •   I still don't always catch on to what you're driving at (Present Simple)
  •   I'm assuming you can't catch on fire (Present Simple)
  •   The house might catch on fire (Present Simple)
  •   You catch on quick (Present Simple)
  •   This format didn't really catch on with the general public (Past Simple)
  •   Now you're finally starting to catch on (Present Simple)
  •   It'll take a while for people to catch on (Future Simple)

Along with catch on, words are popular chop up and duck.

Verbs by letter: r, d, u, c, m, p, b, w, h, a, e, g, s, q, j, l, t, f, o, n, k, i, v, y, z.